The How and the Why Revisited: The Grand Canyon, Glacial Melt, and History Repeating Itself

A common theme addressed herein is the divide between scientists of the subject and the object, or the spiritual and the material.  One side usually claims that its understanding supersedes the other’s. Ironically, the two are really trying to answer the same question from a different angle.  In “the How and the Why,” we discuss the object as a “how” the universe was formed, and the subject as the “why.”  Naturally there are many “how’s and why’s” depending upon what your goal is.  

Yet rather than ascend into a maze of withering logic, we will use a simple physical example to help us to see a bridge between many sides of humanity, for unite we must.  To use a popular quote, “United we stand, divided we fall.”  Humanity is a social animal that performs as unit.  We are becoming the union between individual and group in this Aquarian Age.  Let us descend into a physical example. 

The grand canyon historically has been described as the result of Gradualism, or long steady erosion.  Although this is undisputed in its accuracy, recent phenomenon suggests that it has been formed by both Gradualism and Catastrophism, or, rapid dramatic change in relatively short geologic time.  It was not in six days mind you, but a combination thereof.  In fact, recent data shows that glacial melt caused huge changes within the original model.  The data is not definitive, but promising nonetheless. 

Our business here is not to jump into some melee, it is to show how both processes continue to affect us today.  If during a melt, the Grand Canyon can make huge changes, what is the significance for us in modern times?  Does this reflect our current state at all?  As we discuss in Global Warming pieces, this natural process is exacerbated by our actions, but natural nonetheless.  Imagine though how the prophecies of the Spiritual Community match this data. 

The world is a dynamic process rather than a static destination.  Internal and External sciences serve us best as models for looking at the world.  Where the two converge we can often extract value.  We know that the system continually adjusts in gradual changes, we also know that dramatic leaps historically pepper the landscape.  Imagine that the Earth is about to experience one of those jumps.  Imagine that is why many of us have moved from the coasts inland. 

During the Tsunami in Sumatra December 2005, almost no animals were killed.  Something in their awareness told them to leave.  An elephant may have felt like running to the top of a hill to survey its territories.  In turn, the animals in front of it may have fled its bulk.  Those who survive from its debris may have followed it to feed on its leavings.  Regardless the system adjusted.   

Which of us are the elephant and its entourage, and which are the people who drowned? 

References: 

 

Cox, Stephen (2003). The University of Arizon Alunni Associatiion:“Grand and Young.” Retrieved August 27, 2007, from http://www.uagrad.org/Alumnus/Winter03/canyon.html

 

National Geographic (2007). “How the Earth Was Made: Grand Canyon.” Retrieved August 27, 2007 from http://video.msn.com/v/us/v.htm?g=8aca3c67-e750-4613-8d11-5b424b03969f&f=&fg=rss

 

Steiger, Frank (20xx).  “Creationist Grand Canyon Argument.” Retrieved August 28, 2007 from http://chem.tufts.edu/science/FrankSteiger/grandcyn.htm

 

Herms, Henry (2007). Geology of the Grand Canyon. Retrieved August 27, 2007 from http://teachers.sduhsd.k12.ca.us/hherms/herms/cal/grand_canyon.htm

   

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One comment on “The How and the Why Revisited: The Grand Canyon, Glacial Melt, and History Repeating Itself

  1. […] Karadi, Gouthum (2007) Perfect Paradox, Inc., August 29, 2007. “The How and the Why Revisited: The Grand Canyon, Glacial Melt, and History Repeating Itself.” Retrieved October 7, 2007, from https://perfectparadox.wordpress.com/2007/08/29/the-how-and-the-why-revisited-the-grand-canyon-glacia… […]

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